Powerless Power of Attorney

The Power of Attorney (“POA”) and Statutory Gifts Rider (“SGR”) are two of the most important documents drafted by an elder law attorney.  The absence of or deficiencies in these documents increases the likelihood of the need to commence a costly guardianship proceeding to be able to implement many common elder law planning techniques necessary…

Gift Tax

How much can I gift each year? Most people think you can only gift $15,000.00 per recipient in 2019.  You might be surprised to hear that you can gift a lot more than that.  You might be saying, “I thought the annual federal gift tax exclusion is $15,000.00”.  While you are correct, it is important…

First and foremost, I recommend that you have an open discussion with your family about the disposition of your remains. These are very sensitive issues and there is no substitute for a well- informed family. New York State law, however, does provide a mechanism for you to express your wishes in writing. Section 4201 of…

Traditionally, Medicaid has paid for long-term care in a nursing home, but because most individuals would rather be cared for at home and home care is cheaper, all 50 states now have Medicaid programs that offer at least some home care. 

One of the most unfortunate situations in my practice is when I hear that someone spent most, if not all, of their assets on the cost of a nursing home or home care aides because they believed they were ineligible for Medicaid as a result of having income and assets.  Most often it is due…

Second to the house, an individual retirement account (“IRA”) is usually the largest asset when looking into someone’s financial portfolio.  The tax and Medicaid rules dealing with IRAs are very different yet related, quite complex and often misinterpreted or misapplied.   It is important to have a general understanding of these rules in order to avoid…

A Medicaid Trust is an irrevocable trust designed to protect your assets from the staggering costs of long-term care, usually nursing home care. You will be pleased to know that while the trust is irrevocable, many bells and whistles can be included in the trust, which give you a great degree of control. In fact,…

Co-authored by Joanna C. Feldman This question was recently asked at an event we hosted during which we discussed strategies to leave a legacy after death.  A Medicaid Trust is an irrevocable trust used to protect assets should one need nursing home care and seek Medicaid to help cover the cost.  Because assets in a Medicaid…

Co-authored by Joanna C. Feldman Under the usual fact pattern, a retirement account will not render someone ineligible for Medicaid.  There are initially two major issues when considering whether someone is eligible for Medicaid: resources and income.  Retirement accounts can fall in both categories. For resources purposes, in New York, retirement accounts, such as IRAs, 401(k)s,…

Change is inevitable, and it comes in many shapes and sizes.  Death, disability, and divorce are three of the most common changes in life that can wreak havoc on an estate plan.  If your estate plan is not flexible, there could be unintended consequences.  With the increasing popularity of revocable trusts, whether drafted by attorneys…

While I cannot say whether there are mistakes in your estate planning documents, the wording of your document may be confusing to you as a non-attorney. Legal documents contain a great deal of legalese.  For purposes of this response, I am assuming that you are leaving all of your assets to your children.  First, it…

Co-authored by Joanna C. Feldman Let’s consider the cost of care versus the legal fees to implement proper planning. So often, when I ask clients about their assets, they respond “I have nothing”, yet they own a house.  For some reason, it seems to be common that where there are little cash assets, there is a…

This is Attorney Advertising. This web site is designed for general information only.
The information presented at this site should not be construed to be formal legal advice nor the formation of an attorney/client relationship.

Show Buttons
Hide Buttons